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By the end of the summer, I should be moving most of my "studio" out of my house and into a place not in my house that I can actually call a studio. Yay! progress. I plan on making one of the offices where I am going into an edit/mix room. I can not afford the "nicer" studio furniture and I know I can build something just as good or better. The desk is not the problem.

What I am wondering if anyone had any ideas on an iso box for my computer and all the random hard drives and nonsense that will be hooked to it causing tons of noise. I know I can build a box and line it with sound proofing things, but I am wondering about ventilation and stuff of that sort. The idea of having the computer in a separate room has crossed my mind, but I just am not sure if technically all the cabling for all the peripherals that I will need on the desk can run that length. It must be possible because the dub stages I have been to have their monitors/keyboards/mouse with them in the room and computer in another room.

Anyone have any tips, leads, ideas on this? I am going to continue research on maximum cable length and things for usb, firewire, video etc.

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2 Answers 2

I'd stick with the other room idea if you can pull it off. There are all manner of "repeater" technology that can be cheaper than an isobox (though maybe not if you're building one yourself), and you'll need to worry less about noise vs. sustaining a proper temperature range for your gear.

Start someplace like the Gefen website, they've got a nice tool to help you figure out the kind of gear you'll need to run cables over a distance.

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@Shaun Thanks been checking it out, kind of pricey stuff but looks like it would be good to work up to that. –  Michael Gilbert May 26 '11 at 22:29
    
@Michael - I only point out that tool as a research helper. There are other companies that make repeating gear, many of them cheaper and just as reliable. It gives you a good idea of what kind of equipment you might need though. –  Shaun Farley May 27 '11 at 0:21
    
@Shaun Sure does, I appreciate it. –  Michael Gilbert May 27 '11 at 20:49

Just for comparison's sake, here's a link to KK Audio's Quiet Rack page with prices. I've never used their gear myself but have heard good things about these. http://www.kkaudio.com/quietrack.html

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