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Hey guys,

i recently thought if its any good to have 2 mics on a boompole, like a super cardioid an a shotgun for example. One with a wider pattern, an one thight, and you can choose late which one to take. I don't know if there are any shockmount or windshield for that purpose. It was just a thought. Im looking forward for your opinions. Greets.

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hope you're not gonna be holding it up coz it's probably gonna be a little bit of a strain at long extensions. –  takuya May 19 '11 at 6:13

3 Answers 3

Any system designed for M/S will accommodate two mics.

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If you use something along the lines of a shotgun and an omni mic, you'll get very different sounding results from each.

The other use I can imagine is a system I sometimes use for ADR with two shotgun mics on stands so I can get a close perspective and a further perspective, it also means if your closer mic clips theres a chance the performance isn't lost as the second one was less likely to clip from a distance.

Sometimes for ambient recordings ill use two mics on a mic stand with a stereo bar, and walk that around with a wind shield over the top, into my Fostex-LE.

Recently though I have found it easier just to concentrate on getting great sound on one mic, it saves me space on my recorder, and stops me getting overwhelmed by having to adjust gain/monitor to different mics at once.

I heard on the Kings Speech the sound recordist put microphones almost everywhere so he had loads of takes he could choose from.

Everything is worth a try though!

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One mic on the end of a pole is certainly more desirable for long extensions and and extended takes.

Not really to do with mic pattern, more about levels, but a tip I have found useful is to get yourself (or make one) a Y-splitter cable and split the audio into 2 separate channels then put the level of the 2nd channel 20dB (or perhaps more depending on the situation) lower. This has saved me on multiple occasions from sudden loud sounds. I don't always use this, but in cases where there might be shouting, banging etc, it's definitly something to consider.

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Is that OK with phantom powered mics? –  EMV May 27 '11 at 14:25
    
It is, but you need to be able to only send phantom from one of the channels. So it may not be wise to use this method if using a mixer with global phantom. –  Si Charles May 27 '11 at 15:51

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