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Just finished watching Legend of the Guardians,

and some of the dialogue lines were "doubled" or processed with lo-air or something because one word out of a sentence turned into this massive monster voice, but the rest of the sentence sounded normal.

I'm curious to why the dialogue mixer chose to do that and what plug-ins or processing was used?

Couldn't find any samples online to link..

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3 Answers

I've not seen the film and when I did a quick search on the Internet, nothing came up about the sound editing processes. I reckon a gold badge should be on offer to the one that answers this!

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I'd love to see the film now that you mention. I'm going to take a guess.

  1. They may have made a copy of the dialogue track for that section of dialogue (keeping it in sync with the original), then on the copy track they may have cut out all dialogue except the words selected for augmenting (processing those selected words how they liked using an insert patch or FX send), then blended the results using volume automation or some other automation.

OR

  1. They just selected the individual words chosen for augmenting (either by creating cut points at front & back of each word then selecting [or some other way]) and created a special processed plugin template, then applied the plugin template to all chosen words in the track, then created crossfades for the front and back of each selected word.

OR

  1. Who knows?

You'd have to separate the words in some way to add processing, yet keep the words in sync to the original dialogue track because it sucks to re-align dialogue to picture once it falls out of sync (especially if it's just a few chosen words in a whole scene), and you'd have to have a way to keep the processing for all distinct words available for adjustments on the fly, just in case a choice is made to make any adjustments on the processed sound toward the end of a final mix. The adjustment would have to be made quickly and affect all the processed words at the same time to keep you on schedule. I'd vote for something along the lines of guess # 1. It'd be fun to hear it and learn how they did it.

Sounds like fun!

E. Santiago

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I just noticed I had three choice # 1's. Long day...I'd go with the first choice # 1.

E. Santiago

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