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I have a Shure UT2-TC handheld microphone transmitter with an SM58 on it. I also have a rack of eight ULXP4 receivers, with two spares.

The UT2-TC I have says on its internal label (in the battery compartment) that it's tuned to 603.900 MHz, which is well within the frequency range of the ULX system. However, I have been unable to find a channel on the ULXP4 above 589 MHz.

This is a U.S. system, so the available frequency range may be limited. I will check with the sound engineer to see if we have a receiver for the UT2, but meanwhile I tried and failed to find any info on Shure's website. It would appear that they have discontinued the product. (?)

Does anyone with more wireless microphone experience than I have know of a way to make this work?

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Interested in selling the transmitter? :) I'd make great use of it if you can't! –  user544 Feb 22 '11 at 16:47
    
It's not my transmitter. The theatre company I'm working with owns the equipment. But you can always try asking them... ;-) –  dgw Feb 25 '11 at 2:42

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up vote 4 down vote accepted

If you are in the US, the Shure documentation on frequency bands may be found at this link. Your ULX receiver is in frequency band J1. This document gives the details of the frequency groups Shure has chosen within the band. The group frequencies are chosen to minimize the amount of intermodulation distortion (IMD) between the 20 frequencies in the group. The J1 band does not cover your UT2 transmitter.

Even if your UT transmitter was in the J1 band, on a channel in one of the ULX groups, the audio quality would likely be very poor. These wireless microphones (like most) utilize companding to reduce the dynamic range of the signal returned to the receiver. The chances that the compression circuit in the UT2 transmitter has the correct attack and release time constants, as well as the correct compression curve, to be compatible with the expander in the ULXP4 is small.

So, in summary, you are not going to be able to use the UT2 with the ULXP4 receiver(s).

-p

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I really appreciate the time you took to track down the information and compose your answer. Obviously the problem I had was focusing on the transmitter, which returned no information when I searched for it at Shure.com. It's disappointing that I can't use the two systems together, but not surprising. –  dgw Feb 18 '11 at 22:22
    
Glad to help. All of the major wireless players break their units down in to bands/ranges, and then within the bands into channel blocks/groups. Ranges are the max/min RF frequencies, and groups are channel subsets choses to minimize IMD. As a starting point for RF, you pick the group that gives the most free channels in the space. This is the starting point for working as an A1/A2 when it comes to RF coordination. –  phasetransitions Feb 20 '11 at 16:16

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