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In my current song I created a bass I really like in NI Massive. The only problem is that in my melody, there are a few notes that are REALLY low, c1, c0 range. It also has a decent amount of mid-range tones in this synth.

When the synth is played in this low range, it causes them to get slightly detuned and makes them sound slow. By slow I mean the regular notes have a sort of bite and feeling as if someone were strumming them ridiculously fast (best way I can describe it). When they are played in this low note range the reverberation or super fast strumming effect slows down more and more the lower it gets. Its almost analogous to someone applying and LFO to the bass at a extremely high rate, but this rate gets lower and lower evenly as the pitch goes down.

This is extremely frustrating because when I raise those notes up an octave they sound great but it totally throws off the melody. I wrote a melody that works well with the sound because of this but if possible I would like to use the original.

EDIT: Here is a clip from the song that shows what is happening. The first part has the really low notes and the second part is the revised edition but if you listen carefully you can hear the slight detuning of the notes in that part. The melody matches the theory of my chord structure... so it shouldn't be this off.

EDIT: One last thing in case anybody knows much about Massive. The three oscillators I chose were a sawtooth (I believe sin/saw 1 with the wavetable position all the way on saw), deep throat, and modern talking (not the overused dubstep method). The last two are talking/vocal/formant type oscillators.

Why does it do this and can it be avoided?

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Great question! Do you happen to have some audio examples of this, perhaps a recording of just your bassline with the low and high notes for comparison? Soundcloud links are embeddable. –  Warrior Bob Sep 24 '12 at 16:34
    
I do, but I'm at work right now and I would just edit the current version of the song, but I opted to have it play the raised up notes to not sound crappy for the file I was going to send the artist who is going to do the vocals. I will post an example the moment I get home –  Travis Dtfsu Crum Sep 24 '12 at 16:41
    
@WarriorBob hey, I don't think you have any influence on this, but it appears that Stack Exchange doesn't embed secret links from soundcloud ^_^ oh well –  Travis Dtfsu Crum Sep 25 '12 at 13:22
    
Oh, yeah, unfortunately that is the case. You can always just create a dummy public Soundcloud account though! –  Warrior Bob Sep 25 '12 at 14:27
    
good idea! I'll go ahead and do that for ease of use for other users. I'm trying to only release completed tracks now since my new songs are light-years ahead of the stuff on my soundcloud, but if I get new fans after releasing I think they would be amused at listening to my old songs and seeing my progress (/^_^)/ –  Travis Dtfsu Crum Sep 25 '12 at 14:30
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By slow I mean the regular notes have a sort of bite and feeling as if someone were strumming them ridiculously fast (best way I can describe it). When they are played in this low note range the reverberation or super fast strumming effect slows down more and more the lower it gets. Its almost analogous to someone applying and LFO to the bass at a extremely high rate, but this rate gets lower and lower evenly as the pitch goes down.

Are you using a sub oscillator, or detuning any of your main oscillators?

It is easy to generate the effect you are talking about by adding a low-frequency saw wave to your oscillators. The saw is low enough that your ears don't perceive its fundamental frequency as sound but you do hear it modulating the upper frequencies.

Try slowly sweeping a high-pass filter from about 50 Hz to 200 Hz to get rid of those very low frequencies.


I created a patch in massive that replicates the same low-frequency beating that your soundcloud sample demonstrates. I'm using Ableton, so I dropped an EQ Three right after massive, turned GainLow down to -inf. I found that frequencies values between 50 Hz and 100 Hz preserve most of the character of my patch, though the "beating" is reduced near 100 Hz.

You don't need to do this in Ableton or with EQ Three - any DAW and any EQ plugin should do the job.

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all three oscillators are pitching down 12 steps (an octave). I'll try this later this evening. The things is that the oscillators already do this by themselves, the reverberating I mean, but do so slowly at low notes and I don't want them to. –  Travis Dtfsu Crum Sep 24 '12 at 18:28
    
I posted an example. After thinking about this highpass filter thing, I don't know if it would fix the problem unless one of the oscillators is modulating the others because of its sub frequencies. I don't think I had any that would cause a significant amount of sub frequencies, but I might just have to make a separate synth for the sub track. The three oscillators I chose were a sawtooth, deepthroat and modern talking (not the overused dubstep method). I don't know if that means anything to you but it might help. –  Travis Dtfsu Crum Sep 25 '12 at 13:28
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Why not try it, to see if your guess is correct? –  ObscureRobot Sep 25 '12 at 13:54
    
I'll try both your recommendation and mine this evening when I get home. I really need to start bring my laptop with me to work to try out everybody's solutions. Only reason I didn't automatically make the sub on a new track with its on VSTi was because it eats up a lot of CPU which my Intel Core 2 Duo on my mac has little of regardless of the RAM due to the sheer number of tracks I use in my songs. –  Travis Dtfsu Crum Sep 25 '12 at 14:06
    
try starting with an entirely new project with just the one track. If you have a lot going on, it can be hard to isolate the issue. –  ObscureRobot Sep 25 '12 at 20:42
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As ObscureRobot is getting to, your problem is coming from interferences, particularly from frequencies you can't hear. As you play lower, the frequency difference (in Hz) between the octaves (or whatever harmonic you have playing) decreases, and therefore the apparent LFO rate decreases.

For example, An A octave has one note at 220 and another at 440. That's a difference of 220 Hz, which will not be noticed as a "strumming". If you drop to sub-levels, then the differences can much more noticeably be heard as "strumming".

A high-pass filter might work, but the harmonics of the low frequencies might remain. I would try adjusting the gain on the lowest oscillator. See what works, and keeps your bass sounding how you want it too. If the bass starts sounding to weak, without enough bottom, you could try changing to a sine wave for the lowest oscillator. They tend to sound fuller.

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I will have to check this, this bass has a decent amount of mid tones in it too. Posting an example right now –  Travis Dtfsu Crum Sep 25 '12 at 13:11
    
I used this technique on a similar sounding synth but with less of a guitar-ish tone to it. Lowering the sub oscillator and creating another synth duplicating it note for note but with pure sub oscillators removed the slowing down of the strumming and had more power with the bass notes. I applied a high-pass filter to the sub just to remove all the high notes too. Haven't tried it yet on this specific bass because I was frantically trying to finish another song the last two notes to send out for the master. –  Travis Dtfsu Crum Sep 27 '12 at 13:20
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