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This platform is getting bigger everyday as there are industry professionals&amateurs among us spending their valuable time to help people. I think in the near future, Social Sound Design is going to be a major sound design reference in the web.

So I thought it might be good to provide a list of sound libraries we use, sell or recommend.

Your input is appreciated. Please provide explanations and technical specifications so that we can keep the topic organized.

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That's a nice remark at the beginning! Let's hope it keeps growing :-) –  Andrew Spitz Aug 4 '10 at 7:28
    
@Selcuk, and others as you post, please check this off as a community wiki. Unless @Tim recommends his own library or @Chuck his, we shouldn't be earning the reputation based off of their hard work. On other lists like this we've kept it as 1 post = 1 resource so we have a clean list where each resource has it's own reputation points. It works well. –  Steve Urban Aug 4 '10 at 14:49
    
Dear @Steve, I understand your point and value your opinion. But it is disturbing to classify this attempt as "earning reputaion out of other people's hard work" I had started this because I really lose a lot of time browsing web when I need a specific effect, so I thought this could be a time saver for others, too. I don't think that Tim or Chuck would prefer reputation points rather than valuable customer feedback and recommendation. As a sign of respect to your opinion and community, I had edited my post and deleted the part about Tim's library. –  Selcuk Can Guven Aug 4 '10 at 17:15
    
@Selcuk - I didn't mean to imply that you were attempting to take credit for work that's not yours. Simply trying to avoid a similar problem that appeared on a previous question, a list of sound design books and online resources. I received 100 reputation points for recommending resources I had no input on. I think this is a valuable question. It will save time for many. But as this is a community resource, I see the benefit of marking it a "community wiki." You're free to disagree. While I appreciate your sign of respect, I do believe that Tim's library should be an answer. –  Steve Urban Aug 4 '10 at 17:36
    
Dear @Steve, Thank you for taking your time to explain it thoroughly. I definitely have misinterpreted your point in your first comment. I agree that the links should be among the answers. I appreciate and share your effort the keep it organized. Best wishes. –  Selcuk Can Guven Aug 4 '10 at 18:07
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10 Answers

  1. Chuck Russom FX, independent libraries by Chuck Russom. Awesome effects that are affordable (between $25 and $50 for a download pack). For now, there are 4 packages: Handgun foley, Skateboard, Rocks, and Metal FX.

  2. Rabbit Ears Audio, another independent library by Michael Raphael. Ranges between $9 for 16/44.1 to $50 for 24/96. His first pack is all about rockets!

  3. Blastwave FX, commercial libraries with a huge range of sounds. You can get cheap $25 download packs right up to the huge Blastdrive for $6000 including all their sounds.

That's it for now.

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Soundsnap - user created content, as well as other libraries (Blastwave). Pay per file and has helped me out many times.

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+1 for Soundsnap. –  Chuck Russom Aug 5 '10 at 18:42
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HISSandaROAR provide film sound design libraries in various bit/sample rates:

  • FREE 16bit 44.1kHz
  • LITE 16bit 44.1kHz
  • MID 24bit 48kHz
  • MAX 24bit 96kHz

and the imminent fourth library will also be availablLe

ULTRA 24bit 192kHz Multi-channel Multi-mic

http://hissandaroar.com

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Have just released Library 4 Fireworks - recorded & released 192kHz multi channel multi mic –  user49 Aug 11 '10 at 9:23
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Just to add a bit more detail.

Rabbit Ears Libraries provide libraries as follows:

Free 16 bit 44.1 kHz

Basic 16 Bit 44.1 kHz

Standard: 24 bit 48 kHz

Hi Res: 24 bit 96 kHz

http://rabbitearsaudio.com

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http://soundmountain.com

Sound Mountain is a truly boutique library providing sounds recorded by legendary sound designer Alan Splet & recordist Anne Kroeber.

(Anne provided some unique & incredibly powerful sounds for elements of Land Speed Racers when I worked on the film World's Fastest Indian. Great stuff!)

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How Does Sound Mountain offer its SFX? Do you request certain things and then they search it out for you? The website does not offer a lot of explanation. –  AzimuthAudio Aug 7 '10 at 15:59
    
You contact them with info as to what you need, and what the budget is (of the project) and then negotiate fees, audition material etc... It's almost like inverse of sound dogs approach - as i understand it sound mountain offer material via a bespoke approach, and you comparatively pay a premium for unique sound effects and ambiences... –  user49 Aug 9 '10 at 11:25
    
Thanks for info. Good resource to have in your back pocket –  AzimuthAudio Aug 10 '10 at 1:29
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There is also The Recordist, run by Frank Bry: http://www.therecordist.com/

He's a great guy and has some cool content, check it out (after you have all of my stuff, or course!)

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Dang, you beat me to it, Chuck. –  Dave Matney Aug 5 '10 at 19:41
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Sound Dogs - I like the fact that you can get a low res version of any sound to have a listen and see if you want to buy. I generally use it for oddball effects that I am having trouble creating.

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Although Sound Ideas now owns the remaining stock (and I don't think they're going to produce any more of them), the Network Sound Effects library is an odd little jem.

You've got to watch how you use them, because the tail edits on many of them are atrocious, but it's a great source for some really dated soundnig material. There are pieces of technology in that library that you're going to have a hard time finding to record for yourself. You may even have a hard time finding them in other libraries.

Also, some of the recordings really sound their age, which can be awesome for fitting in with period/archival footage.

http://www.sound-ideas.com/network.html

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http://www.splurgo.com

Though they mostly do loops for music, and the quality runs the gamut, the loop packs are generally cheap enough to take a gamble on. Not your traditional sound libraries, but something I've found useful from time to time.

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