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I have a small home studio, and use about a dozen microphones. As it is a home studio, I work on a limited budget. I purchased inexpensive cables and used (but good) microphones. However, recently some of the XLR-mic connections are getting loose. Specifically, I have two beta-58s that do not get strong connections with the cables. If the mics are moved around during recording, the cables can jostle slightly (but stay attached)

Is this a problem with cheap (and poorly fitted) cables? Should these microphones ever develop connection problems? At this point, is there a way to fix the problem without replacing the cables/mics, or would replacement be the best bet?

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2 Answers

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well it could be a problem with either of them, look at the female adaptor on the cable and see if the small metal tab on it is bent or deformed in anyway, if it is then you may have to buy a new cord. If it is not bent female adapter on cord

then look at the port on the microphone and see if that looks deformed in any way, if it is then you can either buy a new microphone, or void the warranty and replace only the connecter by opening the casing cutting the wires attached and reattach them to the new one.

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I feel lucky that my college professor took the time in studio class to teach us how to make, maintain, and repair cables.

He also made us make all 200+ cables to the studio..

Johnny gives good advice for wobbling. But the best thing IMO, is to just buy new XLR's. Keep the cable and fix it!

I just found this and he does a great job at explaining all the good bits of doing it. Highly recommend you watch this video set.

http://www.ehow.com/video_4419675_soldering-xlr-microphone-cables.html

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