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What type of external microphone is best to use to record gunshots? I am looking for a microphone that will give me a high quality and rich detail such as :

Thanks!

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Great example, very good recording of the gun, but when you do it make sure that you have a quiet background, there's a truck engine or generator in this one. –  filzilla Apr 11 '12 at 18:14
    
You might help us out by letting us know if you plan to use it in a video and if you want to record it as a stereo or mono signal. In video, the pan position should copy the position of the gun in the frame, or off-frame. –  filzilla Apr 11 '12 at 18:20
    
I am looking for an external mic for my current video camera (Go pro Hero 2). So I would like it to be stereo. I am fairly new to recording, but I would really like to make the best investment now when it comes to a mic. –  James Apr 11 '12 at 19:41
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1 Answer 1

I understand that you want an external mic for your Go Pro Hero 2 as to improve the audio quality of the internal mic. Go Pro Hero 2 has 3.5mm stereo mic input so the following are compatible Stereo Mics with 3.5mm plug.

Low budget version: Audio Technica Pro24CM (about $70 at B&H)

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Transducer Fixed-charge back plate, permanently polarized condenser Polar Pattern X/Y Stereo Frequency Response 100Hz - 17kHz Dynamic Range (Typical) 82dB, 1kHz at Max SPL Signal-to-Noise Ratio 57dB, 1kHz at 1 Pa Maximum Input Sound Level 119dB SPL, 1 kHz at 1% T.H.D. Power Requirements 2-10VDC plug-in power Output Impedance 600 ohms Output Connectors 3.5 mm stereo mini plug on cable Pad No Low Frequency Roll-Off No Dimensions (LxDiameter) 4.59 x 0.83" (116.5 x 21mm) Weight 3.9 oz (111 g)

Here is an example of this mic at work hooked up to a GoPro HD Hero2. This fella wanted to record the exhaust pipes on his vette, this video convinced me that it did a decent job. I should think it would do well for machine guns too.

"Weather was killer here today, got the microphone mounted up on the frame directly between the mufflers, and ran it to front of car, mounted GoPro on windshield and took it out for a short video... Sounds amazing! This was with no audio editing either..."

High End Version (about as much as your Go Pro... $299 at B&H) Rode Stereo VideoMic Pro

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Transducer Pressure Gradient, JFET impedance converter Polar Pattern XY Cardioid (Coincident) Frequency Range 40Hz ~ 20,000Hz (selectable HPF@75Hz) Output Impedance 200Ω Maximum Output +4.2dBu (@ 1% THD into 1kΩ) Power Supply 9V alkaline battery Connection 1/8" (3.5mm) stereo mini-jack SPL 134dB, max (1 kHz, 1% THD into 1kΩ) Sensitivity -38dB re 1V/P (12.6mV @ 94dB SPL) ±2dB @ 1kHz EIN 20dBA SPL (A - weighted per IEC651) Dynamic Range 100dB (per IEC651) Signal to Noise Ratio 73dB SPL (A - weighted per IEC651) Dimensions 2.6 x 4.25 x 5.1" (66 x 108 x 130 mm) Weight 4.1 oz (117 g) (without battery)

Famously regarded director of photography, Philip Bloom talks about this mic here: http://philipbloom.net/2012/01/18/rodesvmp/

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Excellent that answers my question! Thank you very much. –  James Apr 11 '12 at 22:39
    
You are very welcome. –  filzilla Apr 12 '12 at 18:33
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