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I've created a drum mix based around the overheads mics. I'd like to produce another mix within the same project based around a couple of room mics we set so I can A/B the two mixes.

Is that possible?

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3 Answers

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You Can route your audio channels to multiple buses, so your main audio channels don't have an output, you don't do any mixing on those channels. So for example if you have 5 channels of audio, route them to buses 1 to 5, do your mix on the buses, send them directly to a sub-mix on bus 11 and from there to the master out. For your second mix route the original audio channels to buses 6 to 10, sub mix them to bus 12 then the master.

you can A/B the two mixes by switching between bus 11 and 12 with the solo button.

Alternatively you could record your mix data in the arrange. Mute the mix when you're finished and record the second take, then just mute/un-mute the data channels as you wish.

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Excellent, didn't know I could output to multiple buses. Thanks I'll give that a go. –  Westicle Jul 8 '11 at 10:58
    
Output buses are a bit weird to figure out at first but they're a VERY powerful tool in Logic, and worth learning how to work with. The main thing that's confusing about them is that Logic assumes that a bus is being used as an effect send rather than a mixing bus, and so all effects on the bus itself default to 0% dry mix. Also, the bus mix fader is a bit fiddly since it's a little knob instead of a full linear slider, although you can enter numbers directly and automate it like anything else. –  fluffy Aug 8 '11 at 18:52
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Conceptually, you could group your tracks together and then duplicate the group. Mute your first group, and make whatever changes you want on the duplicated tracks to make a new mix, and then solo/unmute the groups as a whole to A/B the two mixes.

I don't know how to do this in Logic specifically, but the basic idea is something that I imagine most DAW software such as Logic could handle.

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Yeah that would be one way of doing it. It's a shame they haven't created a simple way of doing it like the way you can A/B to settings on plug ins. –  Westicle Jul 6 '11 at 10:12
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Another way is to make folders.

From CH 13 of the manual:

http://imm.io/7LCC

Just put together some screen shots since I couldn't figure out how to carry over the formatting. Hope it helps! With Folders you can just copy the entire folder, mix differentl, mute/unmute. Easy =)

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That's fine right up until you decide to do any edits to the arrangement. –  fluffy Aug 8 '11 at 6:35
    
True. I guess if you start moving chunks of the song around; just offering options. Years ago a knew a couple guys that swore by Folders for live tracked drums. –  bobsbarricades Aug 8 '11 at 11:09
    
Folders are great for multiple discrete tracks that are part of the same instrument, yeah. They're just not really designed for anything else. –  fluffy Aug 8 '11 at 18:54
    
Your image seems to have been removed. Are you able upload a new screenshot? –  neilfein Feb 4 '13 at 22:03
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