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Still in relation to my application at Dubbing Brothers to work at the e-delivery service, I'd like to know if anyone has ever worked there/with them. I'm looking for information on the specifics of this position. They are receiving the video and audio material and preparing it for post, but what does this actually include? Telecine? File naming? I think that video goes through a lot more beforehand processing than audio, but I'd like to have your testimonies. What is it like to "prepare the material for post"?

Cheers!

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I am no expert but preparing material for post is kind of vague since there are so many aspects to it. Receiving video and audio material gives a better hint since we know we are not dealing with film so no telecine is involved I would guess. (Unless they are doing film transfers to tape.)

For many/most purposes people edit offline with lower resolution video files. Their are exceptions to this as their are many editing in HD with souped up AVID systems and the like. I guess you would probably be digitizing the video and converting to the specifications of the client. You might also have to prep stems from multi-track recordings (DIA, MX, FX) depending how the material is received. You might have to create an OMF, EDL, Pro Tools session, etc. too depending on the client.

I think the 'e-delivery part' might mean that you post the files to a private FTP that the client can download. The ftp has to be fast and the clients download speed does as well for this to work successfully if you are transferring a lot of data otherwise the data is usually just driven by a runner. Once the picture and sound are locked, they are sent to finishing. This is where they conform all of the shots by digitizing the same shots of the low-res cutting copy in high-res using the EDL. The processing comes in after they have a conform usually not beforehand (the systems that add effects and do color correction etc, are very expensive and usually only used in the final stages for budgetary reasons.) Often the sound and picture are sent to different finishing houses for various reasons, only to be matched up in the final conform. Research online and offline editing for more details.

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Great bpert! You've given me a bit to chew on and I'll start right away! –  Justin Huss Jul 29 '10 at 23:06
    
+1 bpert. I know them & the post before tells you everything you have to know. –  Sam Jul 30 '10 at 11:06

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