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I had recorded one audio using recorded. But I get lots of room noise in recording. I try to use audacity's default noise removal option.

But still I don't get good quality audio.

So I want to know is there any other technique to reduce noise

www.youtube.com/watch?v=__eGVza1l8s

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2 Answers

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There is an old saying, crap in, crap out. Audio editing isn't magic. Some types of noise have a particular pattern to them and in that case, sometimes the pattern can be identified and an inverse can be produced to help reduce it, but this is mostly system noise rather than real world noise. In the real world, very little is that predictable. This means that it is hard, if not impossible, to tell what is actually signal you want and what is noise.

If you have a noisy signal coming in, there is very little you can do to make it "less noisy" unless you can simply cut the frequencies associated with it, but in the case of room noise, it's generally broad spectrum and you'd be throwing out the baby (the actual signal you want) with the bath water. This is why studios still exist and provide sound proof rooms to capture clean audio. If there was a magic way to get rid of noise, we could just record concerts and be done with studios.

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Once you have noise, there is only so much you can do. Chopping out frequency ranges works, but also removes any wanted audio in those ranges. Noise reduction techniques often work on statistical reduction algorithms but noise is random, so removing it completely is almost impossible.

The only real solution is to reduce noise on the input - use a better mic, use a better soundcard which has a higher signal to noise separation, install sound deadening room furnishings, isolate the subject, etc.

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