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I need to record conference video/audio, and the audio is giving me trouble. Each hotel has their own type of PA (speaker) system, it is not universally compatible. Each conference takes place in a different hotel.

I want to record the audio from a wireless clip-on microphone that we bring, but I also want the sound from this microphone to be heard in the speakers.

Can I use one wireless microphone, a portable body pack transmitter, and receive this sound in two locations at the same time - the hotel audio system, and the video camera?

Do you recommend a specific system for this scenario? THANKS!

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2 Answers

You want a distribution amplifier. It is a device that takes a single input and produces 2 or more outputs at the same power level. Simply plug the microphone receiver in to the input of the DA and then plug one output in to the camera (or a dedicated audio recorder) and the other in to the sound board.

You could do the same thing with just a simple wire splitter, but there would be signal loss then as the signal would probably not be powerful enough to run two devices on its own. DAs are normally pretty cheap and used all the time for exactly what you are looking for.

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Something like the ART SplitCom would work just fine and costs less then $50. I would advise disabling the cameras built in mic to avoid echo and/ or phasing issues. –  JPollock Mar 5 '13 at 1:30
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When it is required to combine and route audio signals - audio mixers are used. You can obtain a very basic model for around ~100$ and it will solve all your problems. Mixer will allow you to connect one or more audio feeds and then route the combined signal to a number of destinations. The number of mixer outputs is of course defined by the mixer model and price. Just as an example you can take these into account:

  1. Mackie 402-VLZ3
  2. Wharfedale Connect 802

P.S. I'm not recommending these specific models and brands and mention these just an example.

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