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I have a new pair of KRK Rokit 5 Speakers and I love them.. I haven't gotten to stretch their legs yet but they sound great so far.

I obviously want to get the most out of them and since they are for mixing and monitoring, etc., I'd like to make sure their set up correctly..

With a standard, small studio, with a near-field desk setup.. What is the best HF level adjust setting to put them at .. There is one knob for boosting the dB's (ie: a volume knob) but another for 'tweaking' the sound from the speakers (HF Level adjust)... Should I just keep it on 0?

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Unfortunately there is no single answer to this - it depends on your environment, the other studio kit, and on your own preferences. I would suggest playing with it until it sounds 'best' to you. –  Rory Alsop Mar 27 '13 at 21:00

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up vote 2 down vote accepted

Generally, leave all such adjustments flat (e.g. off) unless you have good reason to change them. For example, if you must place the speaker closer to a surface than is optimal, you may get some high frequency (HF) reflections. Tuning down the HF might help a little... though the best answer is always to change the positioning.

Likewise, if the speaker is too close to a wall or (worse yet) in a corner, you may need to tune down the low end.

I must say, however, that the Rokit series is not the best for mixing. They are more likely to flatter the sound. The KRK VXT line is better, not bad for the price, but still far from optimal. I know that doesn't help much if you are stuck with what you have!

I recommend checking mixes regularly with a good pair of headphones, especially if you are mixing music with much bass. Not only will you hear a couple octaves lower, but you will be free of nasty room resonances that I am sure exist -- or have you tuned the room?

Headphones get a bad rap from stodgy old-timers but, hey, how do most people listen to music?

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Thank you, I agree this question could become argumentative, etc., but you did a great job at explaining it in 'broad' terms. Makes sense to me, and is what I thought. Positive reinforcement is a great thing. –  AtlantaDan May 15 '13 at 20:58

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