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In Final Cut Pro 7, I've edited together a scene, using the original audio recordings from the video files. However, after doing so, I realized that I needed to edit the audio using an external program.

I opened the audio from the original video files and have them saved as separate .wav files now, of the same length. However, at this point I am uncertain how to "swap in" the new audio for the old audio.

The problem is that I don't just want to replace one section in the timeline, but I want to replace every section in the timeline which refers to a given clip, and I want it to sample the new audio file from exactly the same places it sampled the old one.

That is, I want to edit it so that it behaves as if I replaced the audio in the video file before I did anything with FCP.

I really don't want to be manually aligning the audio.

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To improve your workflow, you can also try exporting an XML for your sequence. I don't know what audio editor you use but probably they have such a capability to import sequences from different editing softwares. This way you can edit just the needed parts of your audio files and export a single file to replace your whole audio. –  Inan Berbatov Nov 30 '12 at 11:00
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1 Answer

This is dependant on the new .wav files having a similar waveform as the originals. If you have changed them a lot then the method below wont work!


You will need to get a copy of Plural Eyes for Final Cut. Plural Eyes is a 3rd party program that syncs audio. I use the program alot to auto sync externally recorded audio to video clips.

Plural Eyes has a feature where if you lock the video tracks, it wont move them around, so effectively you can sync and replace your reference audio with the .wav files:

By default, PluralEyes will move the clips in the output sequence(s) so that the earliest clip starts at time zero. But sometimes you want one of the clips to stay in place and have the others move relative to that one. If you lock the track that contains that clip, PluralEyes will not move it.

They have a how-to section for Final Cut 7 and video tutorials on their website.

Hope this helps!

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