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Hi everyone

Quick one:
We are shooting the film in tight room with hard walls, squeaky floor and 2-3 actors. Genre would be psycho-thriller with lots of tension and pressure in voice. I've got a limited selection of mics: Rode NTG2, Senn ME66, 416, and could possibly hire Senn MKH50 for special occasion.

Seeing that ME66 is the only one Supercardioid mic from those three, could it be an option for the clear and crisp dialogue? How much I can win with MKH50 in this case if I decide to get it, compared to already available ME66?

Much appreciated!

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3 Answers 3

I very much prefer the mkh50 over the me66, as i'm really not a big fan of the me66.

The mkh50 is the one i always use for small interiors... Sounds really really really good, as long as you can keep the mic close enough to the actors. Also its much smaller physically wich really helps in tight locations. I also use it all the time for micing dialog in cars with a little help from these guys.

Also we use lav mics a lot, when the light on the set forces us to keep the mic to far, or if the set is to small to move the boom as necessary

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if the distance is 30-40cm above the head aimed in the chest would mkh50 work compared to me66 in the same position? I couldnt find information, but do you know if me66 doesnt have interference tube construction? it says that for 416 on off site, but nothing for 66. –  Pretaeperon Sep 23 '12 at 15:19
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The ME66 does have interference tube. That is a good distance to have the mkh50. I think it will sound much more natural, and its much safer to use if the actors tend to turn their heads really quickly; they'll sound off axis really quick with a shotgun mic. But that's beyond the point i suppose. –  Filipe Chagas Sep 23 '12 at 23:12
    
+1,000. Great answer. –  Utopia Sep 26 '12 at 22:20

@filipe-chagas how often are the feet actually in the shots? you could also put fabric on the floor so it doesn't interfere with the dialogue recording.

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That really depends on the project and DP of course, but in my experience, not that often at all, pretty much always on the wide shots of course. The DP i'm working with loves america shots (that's what we call them anyway, a shot framed with the bottom limit just below the knee). We buy foam patches (kind of like stickers) that come in circles of different widths and big squares that we cut to the shape we need and stick them on the shoes when needed. Depends a lot on the surface as well, of course. We used to buy some made of fabric, but they tended to be to slippery for the actors –  Filipe Chagas Oct 5 '12 at 20:53
    
that's interesting...link for the stickers? –  Rene Oct 5 '12 at 23:05
    
I tend to use athletic tape (moleskin) for the feet to minimize feet sound. I use the stuff for planting radios also so there is plenty on hand –  Matt R. Sherman Oct 6 '12 at 1:15
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@Rene, we buy them in convenience stores, for really really cheap. amazon.co.uk/Mini-Foam-Stickers-Value-Pack/dp/B005NIC9EY/… Like those guys, but all black. –  Filipe Chagas Oct 6 '12 at 9:48

@rene another effective method of damping footfall noise discreetly is "Tesa Tape". Definitely would recommend checking out

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right on. thanks! –  Rene Oct 6 '12 at 21:46

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