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Hello SSD!

I've finished my first (complete) trailer done! A short one, but a current and cool one in my opinion.

Here is the goods: http://youtu.be/q4f70CoJV64

Let me know what you think, I know I have a lot to learn but this is the first thing I've done that sounds remotely like a trailer, haha.

The main issue I had was making things sound big without making the low end sound like it was rattling out of the trunk of a rusty honda civic, haha. So some tips on portraying scale in sound design could help out.

Anyhow, thanks in advance! -James

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1 Answer 1

Hey James,

Cool stuff, the effects are organic and blend well with each other. I will say, though, that the trailer is extremely ambiguous... without the title of the game at the end I would have absolutely no idea what I was watching. So while one of my critiques was a lack of identity for the sound design, I realize that much of that is due to what's missing in the trailer itself.

The action in the trailer is very up-close and in-your-face, and I think the effects you've designed would be better served without so much reverb. For this one I would think of reverb as a little mortar between the bricks, and allow only certain sounds to excite a reverb. The gunshots, for instance, sound very washed out and have little impact. Perhaps try varying the use of reverb with the use of delay. Delay can be a great way to add space without feeling like the sound is "back in a room".

The whole idea of 'size' in sound comes in a few dimensions: volume, width of frequency range, use of stereo/surround field, and number of reflections (delay and reverb), to name a few. An increase in any, or all, of the above will result in a feeling of larger size to your effects. You can't rely just on volume if you don't know what people are listening on, so when a sound is meant to sound 'larger' try filling out the frequency spectrum, spread it over the stereo field, and allow that sound to excite a space created from delay/reverb.

Cool stuff, good luck!
~Matt

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