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Hi, I have a very good stereo setup (K&H 0300) and another pair of decent speakers (Event TR6) sitting around. I would love to keep using those speakers and combine them to a Frankenstein Surround system. Will i have something that i can get away with for premixing / sound designing in surround? How would i calibrate this setup, since the speakers will have different specs... My sub is a 200$ and i would use a third speaker from another manufacturer for the centre.

Reading this now, it looks pretty hopeless, and i suppose i will just have have to wait until i have the cash to do an all K&H thing... but their sub alone cost 1.5K $....and i would need 3x 2K $ speakers for rears and center - ouch.

What do the experts say? Is there a way to turn my frankenstein into something usable? Again: premix only...

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Or should i get a medium quality surround setup from a different manufacturer and keep my K&H's just for stereo? –  jack L Jun 12 '12 at 12:32

4 Answers 4

There is a big difference between the two tasks you mention ie sound editing/design vs remixing - the former you will be premixing in another (calibrated) studio, the latter requires a well configured, spec'd and aligned mix room.

So for sound editing, go for it! But read up on speaker line up on the DUC thread - get an SPL meter & line up your speakers so that while they may not be perfectly matched, they will still be level balanced (& definitely better than eg no surrounds!) http://duc.avid.com/showthread.php?t=87830

But for premixing? Personally I would not want to be making critical balance decisions in a room without it being fully specc'd....

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I love the fact that there isn't a "don't do it" vibe here. Great. –  georgi Jun 16 '12 at 13:22

It will be usable but not very accurate, it is not just EQ but also ballistics, the different brands will have slight timing differences across the frequency range.

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I agree with the above, and would also add that you should factor in the room as well. If you treated your room to sound ideal with the stereo K&H setup, you would need to further treat it to optimize the sound with three more O300 cabinets——which, of course, means an even lighter wallet.

I would agree with your idea of buying 5 medium-quality speakers and a sub and using it as a separate system. It would provide a nice opportunity to compare your stereo mixes on a lower-quality set of loudspeakers, as well.

Cheers, ~Matt

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Not only can you, but you should mix with different speakers.

I have 13 speakers in my room - 3 brands, 7 diferent hz (range) speakers and two diferent amplifers and still planing to buy more. I don't know anyone else who has something like that and I can tell that the sound is perfect, best I've even heard, comparing to others.

Why? Becouse every speaker has a gap in hz frecvence.. So it makes max full sound, with all frequencies.. Subwoofers, 25hz, 35hz, 25hz, 20hz, for full and deep bass.. the same goes on mid frequencies, and high frequencies, one speaker 20khz other 25khz, for max full sound and quality, with minimal gap in frequencies.

Just pick all speakers with the same value of ohms, so all speakers will sound in the same volume (loudness).

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