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Hey people,

I just fried my Zoom H2 by using the AC adaptor, it seems it can't handle New Zealand voltage... Replaced batteries inside and it still won't turn on, so something's fried inside. Just wondering, has anyone opened one of these up before? Is it possible to replace the internal parts? Or failing that, is their anything worth salvaging? Should I just auction it off no reserve...? Currently angry, disappointed, sad, and excited as I'm now upgrading to the H4.

Thanks,

Oliver

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@mech Hey whatever happened to your quest to fix your H2? –  Hubert Campbell Dec 2 '10 at 3:29
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5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

There is a big chance that you fried at least the voltage convertor and maybe more IC's.

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It's all tiny surface mount components inside, and replacing them can be very hard or even impossible. I've done my share of smd-(re)soldering, both on existing hardware (wii-remote) and DIY electronics projects and it wasn't fun at all. One wii-remote got destroyed in the process, even though I used a $2000+ high-precision soldering station and knew what I was doing.

Besides, good luck finding the replacement components in singular quantities. Even Zoom themselves wouldn't start soldering smd stuff on their own devices, under warranty they simply replace the entire unit and the old one goes in the bin. (there are similar posts like yours on the zoom forum and other places as well, all answers state that DIY-repair is out of the question)

Opening it up and saving the mic capsules is easy enough though, they are connected with little plastic snap-connectors. Even if you're no electronic wizard, carefully opening pieces of gear can do no harm to anything other than the warranty (watch for screws hidden behind stickers/seals - they void the warranty). I opened up many pieces of equipment I use regularly just because I was curious what's inside.

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you stand 3% chance of powering it via USB.

if that works, the unit can be somewhat likely fixed...

about this false economy thing, time and effort into account, you might be better off just shelling out for a new one.

very little online in terms of pcb photos , but from what i see as pcb design approach, your best bet is there -is- an element that was hopefully fried instead of the main IC in there..

p.s. i would most definitely salvage these babies. zoom mics

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Contact these folks: Music Ways Ltd. P.O.Box 305-111, Triton Plaza, North Shore City, Ak 0757, New Zealand Tel: (64) 9-477-0384 Fax: (64) 9-476-0382 http://www.musicways.co.nz E-mail:info@musicways.co.nz

They do official service for Zoom in NZ and can probably get you schematics and help you with troubleshooting. I would also ask them about refurbished units as a replacement.

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hello, I also I have a zoom h2, a few days ago I dropped the ground, damaged in IC23, but unlike you, I did not find the built and not what your reference. someone could you please take a picture or watch referenica to repair my zoom h2? tanks

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I had the same problem I bought it online and one day I tried to connect it to the power and it burnt...

And it's quite expensive to buy another one

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