Take the 2-minute tour ×
Sound Design Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for sound engineers, producers, editors, and enthusiasts. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In Pro Tools, you have the ability to drop a high-lit regions' selected duration down to the next track by pressing the ; key.

This moves the selected duration that matches the region you had selected, down to the track below it. Allowing you to trim the region the selection falls on to the same duration of the region above with a simple keystroke shortcut, B. The opposite shortcut key is defaulted to the letter P - to go up a track to select the same amount of time.

Is there a matching set of shortcuts in Nuendo? I haven't been able to find this within the program, nor on the internet. Any ideas?

Thanks!

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Very easy and can be done in several modes/ways.

if you have set a range with the range tool just hit the KC assigned to the [Navigate>Down command] (I use the arrow down key).

For other editing methods you can just hit the KC for the [Locators to selection] command (P in my case), this enables you to assign your selected range to your L/R locators thus enabling a bunch of alternate ways to deal with your material. You can even have the preference option [Cycle follows range selection] activated if you like to thus never having to press [P] manually (although this continually moves your locators and you might not like that, I don't).

Personally I rarely use the range tool, I tend to work mainly with the select tool and the locators. So I almost never rely on using a selected range in the way you described. Just my personal style of working.

One OT comment, a very important aspect when using a specific DAW is to not try to emulate an existing working style on another product. It just wont be as effective as learning the program on its own merits.

share|improve this answer
    
"...not try to emulate an existing working style on another product. It just wont be as effective as learning the program on its own merits." Best advise I've seen in a while, Erik! –  ron macleod May 2 '12 at 17:07

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.