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I've read a lot online so I think I have a decent setup.

Roland R26 recording stereo Interior and dynamics on engine and exhaust

Cantar recording two different pan mics (with dual mics in each zepp Shoeps and MKH 416) and a stereo close perspective (dual mkh 50)

Sony M10 with external mics recording distant perspective stereo.

What really worries me is that we are going to use the actual cars from set, and they will continue to use them in a few days after were done. So to my actual question:

What is the best type of TAPE to use to tape cables and mics to the car without risking damaging the paint. It needs to be able to stick to the paint while recording but not leave to much glue residue afterwards and def wont damage the paint.

Brand new cars...

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2 Answers 2

up vote 12 down vote accepted

We (I work at a premium car manufacturer, in development) always use black or grey Tesa Gaffer tape, the type that's almost fabric-like, rather than plasticy, with lots of fibers in both directions.

It doesn't tear off the paint, holds very well (I tested it up to 280 km/h, taping mics to the underside of cars etc) and leaves little to no residue.

If it does leave residue (this might be the case when it gets hot, near exhaust or engine parts), you can use another bit of tape to pull it off the car body.

EDIT:

alt text

It's Tesa 4651 (Premium acrylic coated cloth tape) or Tesa 4657 (Temperature resistant acrylic coated cloth tape).

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EMV that sounds like solid knowledge and I thank you for it! If you can find out exact type it would be great. Recording is on Tuesday night so the more I know the better I can be. –  ErikG Jan 22 '12 at 15:13

An option would be suction cups, the ones with levers to create the vacuum. I have found them in large box home stores such as Home Depot and also in hardware stores such as Northern Tools or Harbor Freight.

If you elect to use a suction cup, be sure the paint is clean. Spray a bit of water on the surface to give the suction cup a bit more grip.

I have purchased devices with four suction cups designed with two pairs of suction cups connected with a hollow round bar. I figure I will be clamping something on that round bar and am afraid I will crush or break it. So to prevent damage I cut a short length of wood dowel, coat it with roofing cement and jam the whole mess down the hollow tube. After a week or so the cement has set and now I can securely clamp most anything onto the tube.

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