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I have an issue with a gig I do every few months.

I record live speeches in outdoor environments around the world.

Some of the locations can get extremely windy within a matter of minutes.

What I need is extremely good wind protection for two MK41 capsules on a gooseneck, while still looking good on camera (i.e. I am not able to place a large furry windjammer on the mics even though I would love to, it's got to look good on camera still).

Another requirement is along with the extreme wind protection from large fast gusts, it's got to still yield good tonality for a voice. Kind of a catch 22, but I know there must be something out there and I really would appreciate anyone's help on sorting this out.

Specific things I have tried:

  • Schoeps B5D - Looks great on camera but not enough for strong wind.
  • Schoeps B20 - Good on camera but tonality sounds horrible for some reason.
  • Schoeps W20 - Great protection, sounds great, just too big and furry for the camera.
  • DPA foams - Great for indoor PA speeches, not enough protection for outdoors.
  • Various Sennheiser foam - Sounds good, not enough protection.
  • Rycote Softie - Not exactly the most optimum tonality I'm looking for.

Does anyone have any experience in this area or any leads on tricks or tips I can use?

Thanks!

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3 Answers 3

I understand not wanting to use a furry windjammer, but just had the radical thought of using one underneath a foam windgag. has anyone tried this?

You could cut up an old rycote windjammer or similar, and try it underneath a much larger foam windshield. Maybe even try some kind of sandwich with two thin foam layers and a furry windsock in the middle. worth a test perhaps?

Either way, seems like some kind of custom solution is required.

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Hey Utopia,

from my point of view there is not THE solution, but a combination of protectives will work- sonically and for the camera department.

What I did quite often:

if too flurry for the camera, cut the hairs and add a stocking.

Good luck with that!

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I've also used stockings for protection of my 4060's, i had a wire frame around the mic's but it was cumbersome and fragile. I guess also to big for your situation.
If i am correct, the whole principle of wind reduction with rycote furry's is based on wind energy being absorbed by the hairs. Putting them in a foam windgag will probably reduce their efficiency to a large amount.

Best thing to do, i think, is discuss this with your local soundgear reseller, maybe they can think of or construct something?

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